Medical Week in Review 12.1.13

Eesh...can you believe it's December?!  Let the Christmas shopping, wrapping and shipping begin.  In an effort to avoid the crowds at the mall, I plan to do most of my shopping online this year.  How are your holiday plans coming along?  If you have time between cookie baking and errand running today, check out this week's more interesting medical news.

A photographer father shares the first year of his preemie son's life in photo.  Baby Ward Miller was born at just 1 lb. 13 oz. and is thankfully doing just fine.

Trained bees are able to detect cancer through breath.  Apparently bees have an extraordinary sense of smell and can be trained to identify certain diseases when participants blow into a glass chamber. 

I hope your Thanksgiving went on without a hitch and that you did not experience any of these 7 common reasons for a Thanksgiving ER visit

How do patients find a healthcare provider?  A new survey show that 65% of patients choose their healthcare provider by word or mouth followed by 51% choosing a provider through an insurance provider directory.  

A new implant could help you lose weight.  The implant, currently undergoing testing in mice, monitors levels of fat circulating in the blood.  When the device detects high levels of fat, it releases the appetite suppressing hormone pramlintide helping you stop eating.  

New tongue-controlled wheelchair helps paralytics.  The new model outperforms the popular sip-and-puff model where users navigate a wheelchair by blowing through a straw. 

Think twice before you smoke weed.  A recent study shows cannabis effects sons into the third generation.  Male progeny of mice injected with THC weighed more than "clean" mice yet showed less motivation to seek out highly tasty foods.  The effects persisted through three generations. 

5 weird things fast food does to your brain.  Looks like those arches are golden for a reason. 

Plan B manufacurer warns the morning after pill the drug is ineffective for women over 176 pounds.  The pill begins to lose effectiveness after 165 pounds.  Since the average American woman weight 166 pounds, this information has widespread implications. 

It's "The coolest thing ever." according to 17 year-old Dee Faught.  3 Rice University engineering students heard about Dee, a teen suffering from bone disorder osteogenesis imperfecta, and decided to help.  Dee's one wish was to be able to reach up from his wheelchair high enough to turn off the light off in his room.  The 3 Rice students created a robotic arm for Dee allowing him not only to turn off his light but also to pick up everything from an orange to a book and a hat.  

Have a wonderful weekend!