Makeup Hacks for Exhausted Nurse Practitioner Students

Study. Clinicals. Cram for exams. Eat. Study. Sleep. Write a painfully long theory paper. Work. Study. Eat. Study. Sleep. So goes the life of a nurse practitioner student. As the time to the semester's end winds down, the number of papers to write, projects to complete, exams to take, and clinical hours to endure winds up. Chances are if you're a nurse practitioner student your tank's running on empty these days and you're waking up tired in the morning. I've been there. 

Some days when utter exhaustion hits me like a ton of bricks, sweat pants and a messy bun are the only way to make it through the day. But, you can only loaf around so long in your slippers, productive or not, before looking sloppy takes a toll on your disposition. Sometimes, taking a few minutes to wash your hair and apply a splash of makeup actually results in a higher degree of motivation. Your attitude and performance follow your outward appearance. So, in the face of looming finals weeks, nurse practitioner certification exams, and projects, here are a few quick make up tricks I use (as commonly seen on my 6am news appearances) to help ward off a fatigued face. 

Perk up eyes with a brightening concealer

Dark circles are a dead giveaway when it comes to fatigue so pick a concealer that not only masks but brightens your under eyes. My favorite? Trish McEvoy's Instant Eye Lift. It isn't cheap but it does the trick!

Use a caffeine containing moisturizer

Yes, that's right, you're going to need more than your morning cup of joe to shake those cobwebs from your face. Using a super-powered moisturizer containing ingredients like caffeine or green tea will give your skin some extra lift and shine. For added effect, apply a cool compress before massaging in your moisturizer. This constricts blood vessels warding off red blotches and under eye bags. Try M.A.C Strobe Cream.  

Subtly highlight and define cheek bones

If you've never used a liquid highlighter to define and brighten your cheek bones, the time to start is now. Liquid highlighters provide an enviable dewy glow and just a touch of color looking natural and radiant-much more effective than a shot of espresso. My go to? Benefit Cosmetics' High Beam.

Apply natural shimmer to lids

Keeping your eyeshadow light and bright creates the illusion of wide-awake eyes. Try a golden, pearl, or neutral shadow with just a touch of shimmer. Trish McEvoy Glaze Eye Shadow in Glamorous Gold gives a fresh effect. 

Play up your lashes

Apply two thin coats (clumps are a no, no!) of mascara to both your bottom and top lashes to make your eyes pop. You can even ditch your usual eyeliner for a fresh "I just woke up this way" look. My make up bag contains MAKE UP FOR EVER's Smoky Extravagant Mascara in black. Give yourself some time to adjust to the oddly shaped application brush and you'll grow to love it. 

Apply a touch of gloss

Now for the finishing touches. Applying a touch of neutral or lightly colored gloss will complete your well-rested look. Avoid dark colors as they can highlight any remaining dark circles under your eyes. In general, a more natural color palate conveys a fresher appearance. Try NARS Lip Gloss in Striptease

 

What tricks do you use for a wide awake appearance despite your busy NP student schedule?

 

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Comments

This could also be for the busy NP!

Claire

Who cares who the article is written for. Read if it pertains to you and move on if it doesn't.
This poor me, civil rights redundancy is killing me. There are a million websites. I guess you need to find the one that is talking to "you". My goodness...

kwnp

As a female, I appreciated this article. I enjoy reading my daily emails from Midlevel U. Thank you Erin!

Vicky

Hi John,

Understood! I don't assume all nurse practitioners are female, of course, but MidlevelU content is admittedly heavy on female-related content. It is closest to my personal experience. On occasion, we do write posts specifically for guys

We also currently have a male NP student writing for MidlevelU and would welcome another male voice if you have ideas to share! 

Erin Tolbert

Hello,

I'm just curious: why do you assume that exhausted nurse practitioner students are female? I'm not saying that an article like this shouldn't be here - not at all. I'm simply wondering how widely relevant your site is to nurse practitioners (and students) if your assumption is that nurse practitioners are just like you (i.e., in this case, female).

I was seriously thinking about applying to write for you guys, but this kind of stuff makes me think that I shouldn't.

John

John